Last edited by Zololl
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

5 edition of Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors, Hospitals and Medical Care (Great Lakes Connections: The Civil War) found in the catalog.

Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors, Hospitals and Medical Care (Great Lakes Connections: The Civil War)

by Nancy Eckerman

  • 118 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Arcadia Publishing .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States - Civil War,
  • United States - State & Local - General,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • History - U.S.,
  • History: American

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages128
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10607978M
    ISBN 100738519197
    ISBN 109780738519197
    OCLC/WorldCa48428193

    The Civil War launched the profession of nursing in the United States, says Jane E. Schultz, PhD, professor of English, American studies, women s studies and medical humanities at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and the author of Women at the Front: Hospital Workers in Civil War America and This Birth Place of Souls: The.   Six Ways the Civil War Changed American Medicine years ago, the historic conflict forced doctors to get creative and to reframe the way they thought about medicine A ward in Carver Hospital .

    Civil War Medicine June 3, Freemon, Frank R. Gangrene and Glory: Medical Care during the American Civil War. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, Miller, Francis T. history of the Civil War. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, Inc., Reimer, Terry. One Vast Hospital: The Civil War Hospital Sites in Frederick, Maryland, after. One Vast Hospital: the Civil War Hospital Sites in Frederick, Maryland after Antietam with Detailed Hospital Patient List. Frederick, MD: The National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Schroeder-Lein, Glenna R. Confederate Hospitals on the Move: Samuel H. Stout & the Army of Tennessee. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press,

    Hospital Stewards of 2nd Division, 9th Corps - Petersburg, VA, October Chesapeake Hospital and Grounds - Hampton, VA. Patients in Ward K of Armory Square Hospital - Washington, D.C., August Field Hospital after the Battle of June 27 - . Nursing During the Civil War as Described by Roberta West in Her Book “History of Nursing in Pennsylvania” published by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association in c By Jane Early, BSN, RN. The outbreak of the Civil War in found little differences in the care of the sick and wounded than during the Revolutionary War.


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Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors, Hospitals and Medical Care (Great Lakes Connections: The Civil War) by Nancy Eckerman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors, Hospitals, and Medical Care is a unique visual history of the people and places most vital to the medical care of Indiana troops during America's darkest hour.

From the guerilla warfare in Missouri to the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, Indiana men and women struggled to care for the sick and : $ Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors, Hospitals, and Medical Care is a unique visual history of the people and places most vital to the medical care of Indiana troops during America's darkest hour.

From the guerilla warfare in Missouri to the Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors of the Army of the Potomac, Indiana men and women struggled to care for the sick and injured. Get this from a library. Indiana in the Civil War: doctors, hospitals, and medical care.

[Nancy Pippen Eckerman]. In Civil War medicineDr. Keith Wilbur takes you on a detailed and fascinating tour through the medical history of this bloody and devastating war.

Hundreds of illustrations, combined with well-researched and engaging text, tell the tale of the challenges presented to physicians with each new battle and the often-heroic ways those /5(29). "Civil War Medicine tells the story of Assistant Surgeon James Fulton of the rd Penn.

Inf. Well written and detailed, this book is a must for any Civil War medical enthusiast."5/5(3). 5 Nancy Pippen Eckerman, Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors, Hospitals, and Medical Care.

(Chicago: Arcadia Publishing, ), Nokes, Garry J., Images of America: Jeffersonville Indiana. (Chicago: Arcadia Publishing, ), 6 “Army and Navy Personal,” The United States Army and Navy Journal, and Gazette of the Regular and. The Indiana Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s Home has operated in Knightstown, Indiana, since the Civil War to care for the children and grandchildren of veterans.

Veterans’ children from all subsequent wars have been eligible for admission, until the Home’s closure in 4) Captain Sally Tompkins Sally Louisa Tompkins founded a private hospital in Richmond, Virginia, to care for the flood of Confederate wounded.

During the war, her hospital cared for 1, soldiers and suffered only 73 deaths, which was the lowest mortality rate of any military hospital. In the wake of these broader changes, and as the medical profession matured and secured a new authority as elite, scientific practicing physicians, consumer demand and social expectation combined with an appreciation of what medical science might be able to offer, created new demands for medical care.

The Civil War years were an important. Civil War-Era Hospitals By Stanley B. Burns, MD Editor’s Note: This essay series is written by Mercy Street's medical, historical and technical advisor, Stanley B.

Burns, MD of The Burns Archive. Bys Union doctors had served in the field and in the hospitals; in the Confederacy, about 4, medical officers and an unknown number of volunteers treated war casualties. in both the North and South, these men were assisted by thousands of women who donated their time and energy to help the wounded.

Civil War medicine was nothing like you would expect to see in today's world. Medical care during the Civil War was rather primitive. There are many Civil War medicine pictures which show grizzly scenes. Suppose you’re a Civil War soldier.

It really doesn’t matter much which side, although medically speaking you were a little better off if you. Indiana, a state in the Midwest, played an important role in supporting the Union during the American Civil e anti-war activity within the state, and southern Indiana's ancestral ties to the South, Indiana was a strong supporter of the a contributed approximatelyUnion soldiers, sailors, and marines.

Indiana's soldiers served in military engagements during the War: American Civil War. • War Doctor: Surgery on the Front Line is published by Picador (£). To order a copy go to or call Free UK p&p over £15, online orders only. For medical practitioners in the field during the Civil War, germ theory, antiseptic (clean) medical practices, advanced equipment, and organized hospitalization systems were virtually unknown.

Medical training was just emerging out of the “heroic era,” a time where physicians advocated bloodletting, purging, blistering (or a combination of. Caring for the Men The History of Civil War Medicine. When the war began, the United States Army medical staff consisted of only the surgeon general, thirty surgeons, and eighty-three assistant surgeons.

Of these, twenty-four resigned to "go South," and three. History Lesson: Civil War wounded treated in Evansville area hospitals. During the Civil War, four hospitals served the Evansville area and took in hundreds of injured persons. Medicine in the War Doctors and nurses were recruited from civilian hospitals to serve in the United States Army medical corps, while others volunteered with the American Red Cross.

Hospitals were established at home and abroad to care for the sick and wounded, and new medical technologies, such as mobile X-Ray machines and motorized ambulances.

Medical Care in the Civil War. Chloroform, opium, whiskey, smuggling and surgeries on kitchen tables. Together, these things sound like the plot of a a weird mystery television show.

Skidmore RS, ed The Civil War Journal of Billy Davis: From Hopewell, Indiana, to Port Republic, VA. Greencastle, IN: The Nugget Publishers; Straubing HD, ed In Hospital and Camp: The Civil War Through the Eyes of Its Doctors and Nurses.

Stackpole Books: Harrisburg, PA; Whitehead WR. Adventures of an American Surgeon: A 19 th Century. Nursing in the Civil War By Stanley B. Burns, MD. Editor’s Note: This essay series is written by Mercy Street's medical, historical and technical advisor, Stanley B.

Burns, MD of The Burns.The state of medical knowledge at the time of the Civil War was extremely primitive. Doctors did not understand infection, and did little to prevent it. It was a time before antiseptics, and a time when there was no attempt to maintain sterility during surgery. No antibiotics were available, and minor wounds could easily become infected, and hence fatal.

While the typical soldier was at very high risk of being .There were only about hospitals in the entire country, and no formal nursing schools existed. The massive numbers of sick and wounded men who needed care during the Civil War exacerbated the lack of medical professionalization, and wartime hospital facilities, particularly early in the conflict, were primitive and disorganized.